Glixx Laboratories Inc

               Your exclusive source for special chemicals

Glixx Laboratories

 

   sales@glixxlabs.com      Toll-Free: (855)Go-Glixx   Tel: 781-333-5348    Fax: 781-333-5368 

 

Cell Cycle

The cell cycle or cell-division cycle is the series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication of its DNA (DNA replication) to produce two daughter cells. In bacteria, which lack a cell nucleus, the cell cycle is divided into the B, C, and D periods. The B period extends from the end of cell division to the beginning of DNA replication. DNA replication occurs during the C period. The D period refers to the stage between the end of DNA replication and the splitting of the bacterial cell into two daughter cells. In cells with a nucleus, as in eukaryotes, the cell cycle is also divided into three periods: interphase, the mitotic (M) phase, and cytokinesis. During interphase, the cell grows, accumulating nutrients needed for mitosis, preparing it for cell division and duplicating its DNA. During the mitotic phase, the chromosomes separate. During the final stage, cytokinesis, the chromosomes and cytoplasm separate into two new daughter cells. To ensure the proper division of the cell, there are control mechanisms known as cell cycle checkpoints.


The cell-division cycle is a vital process by which a single-celled fertilized egg develops into a mature organism, as well as the process by which hairskinblood cells, and some internal organs are renewed. After cell division, each of the daughter cells begin the interphase of a new cycle. Although the various stages of interphase are not usually morphologically distinguishable, each phase of the cell cycle has a distinct set of specialized biochemical processes that prepare the cell for initiation of cell divisions.


MEK-016

Inverse Benzodiazepine Agonist

 

 

 

 

NVP-VID400

Specific inhibitor of the 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3)-24-hydroxylase (24-hydroxylase)